Council Quotes

Communications from the Colorado Council of Medical Librarians

MLA’15 Updates

Posted by mmclurerams on April 13, 2015

NPC Members, here is a brief update on MLA’15.  Please share parts of this on the official meeting blog and on listservs that you subscribe to.

Register for MLA’15, Librarians Without Limits

At MLA ’15, “Librarians without Limits,” in Austin, you will network with 2,300 friends and colleagues who share your passion for the value of using health information to improve health and get reenergized with new ideas and understanding of new opportunities. There is no limit to what you can learn, including:

  • latest trends in technology
  • best practices in service
  • effective leadership techniques
  • ways to enhance intellectual growth
  • ideas to improve services at your library
  • new, innovative resources for efficiency and cost savings

Build your case to attend the meeting by focusing on these and many more benefits.

Online Meeting Scheduler
MLA’s online scheduler will help you navigate the meeting: http://www.eventscribe.com/2015/MLA/. It includes an online program, exhibit hall floor plan, lists of exhibits and lists of attendees. Note, access to My Plan and Online Meeting Content (session recordings) is limited to only paid annual meeting registrants. If you would like access, signup for e-Conference Registration (package D) at http://mla15.meeting.mlanet.org/registration/how-register. For information about Online Meeting Content, see: http://mla15.meeting.mlanet.org/register/econference.html.

MLA ’15 Mobile App
MLA will be launching the MLA ’15 mobile app in the coming weeks. Attendees will be able to search exhibitor listings in a similar way as they currently do on the MLA online scheduler. Stay tuned for more information on the MLA ’15 mobile app.

Welcome Reception / Opening of Exhibits – Celebrating Austin’s Culture
The theme of Saturday night’s opening of the exhibit hall will be “Celebrating Austin’s Culture.” Whether dressing like your favorite Austin City Limits performer or kickin’ back in your boots and bandana, the Opening Reception will celebrate all that is Austin – the live music capitol of the world.  Attendees are invited to enjoy the flavors of southwest food and some local music while reconnecting with colleagues old and new. Exhibitors are encouraged to incorporate the theme into their opening night plans.

Sharing on behalf of MLA,
Merinda McLure

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CCML Education Committee has openings for two new members

Posted by mmclurerams on April 10, 2015

Hello!

As was shared at today’s CCML meeting, our CCML Education Committee has two spaces for members to serve during the coming year. The committee plans educational opportunities for the membership, organizes an education program (typically a speaker) for the September and February CCML meetings, and at the November meeting facilitates member reports of professional development experiences enjoyed during the past year. Marie St. Pierre and I are continuing as members for the coming CCML year.

Please email me by April 30 if you have questions or would be interested in serving. We’ll appoint two new members by May 15.

Merinda (current CCML Education Committee chair)

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But It’s Supposed to be a State of Mind

Posted by richardmaxwell on April 9, 2015

Probably the worst time to look into what science says about health in retirement would be about a year and a half into such a change in lifestyle, since it’s a little late to panic, but let’s give it a try and see how depressing it might be. The word “delusion” turns up in one report from NPR, an organization that I once considered a friend. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conspired to poll pre- and post-retirees on how the former expect their health to be in retirement and how it is actually turning out for the latter.

Thirteen percent of pre-retirees say their health will be worse once they retire than it was during the five years prior to retirement, while 39% of actual retirees say that it is worse. This leads to snarky comments from some researchers, such as “the poll results look to me like a lot of that optimism was drawn from a deep well of self-delusion” and “Hello. That’s what getting older is eventually about. We’re all going to have serious health problems in retirement, and eventually really serious health problems.” Thank Jeff Goldsmith, a health care futurist and author of The Long Baby Boom: An Optimistic Vision for a Graying Generation, a book about aging baby boomers, for being so tactful.  Jeff himself graduated from college for the first time in 1970, putting him, if I’m not deluding myself about my dwindling math skills, smack in the middle of the boomers he’s writing about.  He is, in other words, entitled to his informed and evidence-based opinion. Damn.

In the same poll the pre-retirees were also more optimistic about how happy they’d be in retirement, with 5% saying they expected to be less happy, while 17% of post-retirees reported that in fact they were unhappier than in the preceding five years. Maybe they somehow managed to get a peek at the health portion of the same survey.

A metanalysis from 2013 might be reassuring to folks spending most of their day in front of a computer screen, such as…just to choose a random example…a lot of librarians.  It found that while some retirees follow up on their good intentions by actually increasing their physical activity level, that still “did not make up for the loss of work-related physical activity, especially for those who previously worked in physically demanding occupations.” Based on that, for many of us simply getting vertical and not spending seven or eight hours glued to a monitor would qualify as a step in the right direction. Pacing while binge-watching something on Netflix could be seen as the equivalent of training for the Iron Man Triathlon.

Even strenuous exercise such as that can’t delay forever the downward march of the line on life’s graph, as our friend Jeff Goldsmith suggested earlier.  What about that?  Any progress in delaying the inevitable final exit? A search on the term “anti-aging” in Google turns up an amazing number of creams (one even endorsed by the interesting Dr. Oz) guaranteed to remove/control facial wrinkles. Now this would be intriguing if a high percentage of elders died of facial wrinkles, but that doesn’t seem to be the case, so a little more digging was required.

“Extending life” seems to be the term that succeeds in Google, producing a number of hits that appear to range from science to sciency to the domain of Professor Marvel, who is (spoiler alert) the Wizard of Oz (not the same as above, probably), and also the snake oil selling counselor to Dorothy. You’ll find seven ways to extend life as well as the possibility that humans could live 500 years or 800 years…take your pick. It could be gene manipulation or it could be dietary or it could be a pill or it could be as simple as closing the shutoff valve and opening the drain at the bottom…wait…. That last one seems to be to extend the life of your water heater, which was mixed in with the human longevity articles along with one for extending the battery life of your IPod and another to extend the life of your dog.  Useful if you do pass 150 and beyond but not directly pertinent.

In what appears to be real science, David Sinclair of Harvard reported that his research team “had been able to drastically reduce the functional ‘age’ of muscle tissue. Treating the mice with the metabolic co-enzyme NAD+ effectively reversed the aging process within the skeletal muscle by increasing muscle tone and producing effects similar to eating a healthy diet and exercising.” While human testing is now ongoing, the original laboratory and specimens are inaccessible since the newly muscular mice overthrew their masters and have blockaded the doors.  Negotiations are taking place via Twitter, which the mice quickly became as adept at as most human users.

Posted in musings by maxwell | Leave a Comment »

CCML Quarterly Meeting April 10 2015

Posted by mariestpierre2525 on April 8, 2015

Friday, April 10, 2015 at the Rocky Vista University – the room will be the Harvey Lab

http://www.rvu.edu/maps.asp

9:00 to 9:30 networking and continental breakfast

9:30 to 10:30 main program – speaker is Maddie Philley, MBA, Benefits administrator at Children’s Hospital Colorado.  She will be speaking about corporate wellness programs,  what goes on behind the scenes and how this translates into health and wellness knowledge. 

10:30 to 10:45 break

10:45 to 11:45 business meeting

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2015 Graber Award Recipient

Posted by skatsh on April 7, 2015

Established in 2002, the Marla Graber Award for Excellence and Achievement in Health Sciences Librarianship is awarded annually to recognize CCML members who have made outstanding contributions to CCML and to health sciences librarianship at the local level.

The CCML Awards Committee takes great pleasure in announcing this year’s recipient, Dana Abbey.  Dana’s roles in CCML have included

  • President-Elect 2011-2012
  • President 2012-2013
  • Past President 2013-2014
  • Convener of Consumer Health Special Interest Group
  • Active member of CCML Advocacy Committee
  • Representative to the Colorado Medical Society CE Committee, advocating for libraries and presenting the Library Champion awards
  • Leader of the charge for future digitization of the CCML archives
  • Presenter of information on NLM databases and resources and developments in health care

We are fortunate to have had Dana as the Colorado liaison from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/Midcontinental Region since 2005.  In her capacity as Health Information Literacy Coordinator, she has increased public awareness and support for health sciences librarianship through her many workshops, presentations, and partnerships with various groups and government agencies.

She has also been active in MCMLA, including serving as Chapter Council alternate and serving on the Exhibits and Fundraising Committee for the 2014 Quint meeting.

Dana’s extensive CV includes many peer-reviewed publications and web resources.  Her Resource Guide on the UC Health Sciences web site covers topics as diverse as hydraulic fracturing, veterans’ health, medical and retail marijuana, and health information for limited English speakers.   She has also exhibited at many local, regional, and national meetings of librarians and health care professionals.

All of these written, online, and face-to-face offerings have served to increase the visibility and appreciation of CCML, NLM, and health sciences librarianship.

To all of her roles, whether in group settings or in response to individual questions, Dana brings a lovely poise, calm demeanor, openness, helpfulness, and sense of humor.

It is with deep gratitude and affection that we award Dana Abbey the 2015 Marla Graber Award.

The CCML Awards Committee

Lisa Traditi, Chair

Margaret Bandy

Elaine Connell

Sara Katsh

Posted in ccml stars, committee reports, fyi | Comments Off on 2015 Graber Award Recipient

Precision Medicine: Finally, it’s all about YOU!

Posted by dabbey on March 20, 2015

At the January 2015 State of the Union Address, President Obama announced his Precision Medicine Initiative. This initiative would put $215 million dollars toward understanding how to personalize an individual’s medical treatment based on his or her genes, environment and lifestyle. While the concept of precision (also referred to as personalized or individualized) medicine isn’t new – think eyeglasses and blood transfusions – advances in science and technology will allow for the exploration of novel treatments and prevention strategies for complex diseases like coronary artery disease, COPD, and hypertension. One million citizens will be asked to volunteer their health data and numerous public and private entities will be collaborating to explore effective disease prevention and treatment.

Why Now?

Developments in basic science, genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and advances in technology supporting mHealth, electronic health records, and the storage of big data have created the perfect environment to greatly expand precision medicine. If the past ten years is any indication of rapid change, the sky’s the limit for the next decade:

  • Amount of time to sequence the human genome: 2004-2 years, 2014-2 days
  • Cost of human sequencing: 2004-$22,000,000, 2014-$1,000-$5,000
  • Number of smart phones: 2004-1,000,000, 2014-160,000,000
  • Computing power: 2004-n, 2014-n16

Precision Medicine in Action

The Veteran’s Administration (VA) Office of Research and Development has been working to identify genes linked to post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), high blood pressure, and heart disease. VA researchers have discovered that individuals with a certain form of the serotonin transporter gene 5-HTT are at a greater risk for PTSD and depression, information which helps individualize use and dosage of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). They have also found that people with certain forms of angiotensin II receptor type-1 (AGTR1) may have an increased risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, and diabetes. This information can help clinicians develop a personalized preventative care program. Find out more on VA research.

Precision medicine can not only impact an individual, it can address health prevention in an entire community. In 2008, an OB/GYN began mapping children born into poverty in Gainesville, Florida. She was put in contact with a sheriff who was also interested in mapping, but her focus was the community’s incidence of crime. When the two women met, they discovered the maps matched exactly to a one square-mile area and further investigation showed the area also had the highest rate of domestic violence, child abuse and neglect. But why? A ride around the area revealed a lot about the environment and lifestyles of community members. There was poorly maintained housing and a complete lack of access to services like child care, healthy food and medical care – with the closest clinic a 2-hour bus ride away. Find out more about what happened to this community.

Resources for Genetic and Environmental Health

Clinical

Community College and University

  • Environmental Health and Toxicology – portal links health professionals and consumers to many resources to understand the connection between the environment and human health and development.
  • GeneEd Web site – (Grades 9 -12+) Links to vetted genetic Web sites based on high school science curriculum. Includes lesson plans and current events.
  • Genetics Home Reference – Consumer-friendly information about genetic variation and human health.

Consumer and Patient Education

  • Environmental Health and Toxicology – portal links health professionals and consumers to many resources to understand the connection between the environment and human health and development.
  • Genetic Alliance – Nonprofit health advocacy organization committed to transforming health through genetics and promoting an environment of openness.
  • Genetics Home Reference – Consumer-friendly information about genetic variation and human health.
  • NHGRI Talking Glossary – Genetic terms, images and animation. (English/Spanish).
  • Office of Rare Diseases Research – Rare diseases information for patients, families, healthcare providers, researchers, educators and students.

Genetics Professionals

K-12

Public Health

  • Environmental Health and Toxicology – portal links health professionals and consumers to many resources to understand the connection between the environment and human health and development.
  • PHPartners – a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, public health organizations, and health sciences libraries which provides timely, convenient access to selected public health resources on the Internet.
  • Public Health Genomics – information on infectious diseases and noncommunicable diseases with a focus on human and pathogen genomics, genomic tests, family history, public health science, programs and practice, as well as policy and legislation.
  • National Information Center on Health Services Research and Heath Care Technology (NICHSR) – information and tools for the health services research community.

Researcher Tools from NIH

  • GenBank – an annotated collection of all publicly available DNA sequences.
  • Gene – integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes, and links to genome-, phenotype-, and locus-specific resources worldwide.
  • Genes and Expressions – Tools to help users query and download experiments and curated gene expression profiles.
  • Human Genome Resources – integrated, one-stop, genomic information infrastructure for biomedical researchers from around the world so that they may use these data in their research efforts.
  • International HapMap Tool – partnership of scientists and funding agencies from Canada, China, Japan, Nigeria, the United Kingdom and the United States to develop a public resource that will help researchers find genes associated with human disease and response to pharmaceuticals.
  • NCBI Webinars and Courses – a series of webinars and courses led by NCBI staff who explain and demonstrate the use of various NCBI web resources with particular emphasis on recent changes and improvements.
  • OMIM – comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily.

Other

-Dana Abbey, Colorado/Health Information Literacy Coordinator

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Join Us! March and April MLA Webinar and Webcast for CCML Members

Posted by mmclurerams on March 10, 2015

The CCML Education Committee is happy to announce that we’ll be partnering with the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Health Sciences Library and the Colorado State University Libraries to sponsor CCML member access to the following March MLA webinar and April MLA webcast.

Please register your interest in live or post-event viewing, via the registration forms linked below.

MARCH 2015

Limitations and Critical Appraisal of Systematic Reviews
Co-sponsored by CCML and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Health Sciences Library

Systematic review publications are important to health care and policy decisions, but they are not without their limitations.  Understanding these limitations, and being able to instruct patrons on them, is a key component of our work as health sciences information professionals. This session will provide a detailed discussion of the impact of biases, publication delays and methodologic quality of systematic reviews, particularly on their application in clinical practice.  The presenters will also give an overview of systematic review appraisal, including interpretation of commonly reported statistical measures. See complete details.

Join us, to view live: March 18, 12-1:30 p.m., University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Library, Tower Room. RSVP via the registration form.

Request post-event, CCML member access to the recording: registration form.

APRIL 2015

The Diversity of Data Management: Practical Approaches for Health Sciences Librarianship

Co-sponsored by CCML, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Health Sciences Library, and the Colorado State University Libraries

This webcast is designed to provide health sciences librarians with an introduction to data management, including how data are used within the research landscape, and the current climate around data management in biomedical research. Three librarians working with data management at their institutions will present case studies and examples of products and services they have implemented, and provide strategies for and success stories about what has worked to get data management services up and running at their libraries. See complete details.

Join us, to view live: April 22, 12-1:30 p.m., Colorado State University Libraries, Room 203. RSVP via the registration form.

Request post-event CCML member access to the recording: registration form.

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You’re Not What You Eat…Probably

Posted by richardmaxwell on February 11, 2015

There’s good news to be found on the nutrition front if we’re to believe reports in the news media recently.

First of all, Brian Williams on NBC reported (cut the guy some slack here…he didn’t claim to be an avocado farmer) that two studies had shown the latest wonder foods to be avocados and oatmeal. Wonder foods, of course, are a movable feast, and I look forward to cinnamon rolls taking a turn in the spotlight.  But for now we need to consider what to do about the current stars.

The avocado news comes from the Journal of the American Heart Association in January 2015.  The authors take direct aim at the apple by recommending an avocado a day. Say it ain’t so.  How many people have been fending off doctors for how many years by desperately trying to figure out a way to take in that single, powerful Macintosh or golden delicious each day?  And do we now drop the apple in favor of the avocado or do we simply add the avocado?  They fail to make this clear, and the whole thing demands further research.

Here’s some of that further research freshly done:

You do not need to choose!  No need to agonize over which to cast aside.  According to allrecipes.com, my go-to site for practical solutions to scientific conundrums, you can have it both ways.  Try Easy Apple Avocado Salad, for example, or if its meager 3 ½ stars rating gives you pause, how about the 4 ½ star Kale, Apple, Avocado, and Bacon (!!) salad?  Certainly the big three will overpower any possible problem associated with the bacon…and the salad will actually have flavor.

Cautionary note: WebMD says that the avocado is only “LIKELY SAFE” when eaten in “food amounts.”  Not clear on what constitutes a food amount, but it seems like a pretty subjective measurement.

Oatmeal was not the actual focus of what was cited by NBC (oh Brian….), rather the article in JAMA Internal Medicine looked at whole grains more generally.  The conclusion: not much new, really. “Higher whole grain consumption is associated with lower total and CVD mortality in US men and women, independent of other dietary and lifestyle factors.” I think they’re hinting at immortality there, but lack the fortitude to come right out and say it.

Allrecipes failed to be as helpful when I asked for avocado and oatmeal together, but really…how tough is it to simply hack up a freshly cleaned avocado and toss it into a bowl of oatmeal?  Even with my slavish devotion to using recipes for nearly everything, I believe I could improvise that one. There’s also the possibility of making use of that idle food processor or blender. Certainly something resembling food would result and you’d know that good health would result from somehow choking it down.

The other good news comes from reading between the lines of the Associated Press report on what testing commissioned by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman found was in bottles labeled as herbal supplements.  Sold at retailers GNC, Target, Walgreen’s, and Wal-Mart, containers claiming to hold such things as echinacea and St. John’s Wort were frequently found to contain no echinacea or St. John’s Wort DNA.  There instead were such things as rice, garlic, wheat, beans, and a tropical houseplant.  Herbal supplements are not regulated by the FDA other than to ask manufacturers to verify that their products are safe and correctly labeled. While these little unmentioned bonus ingredients could present problems for those with food allergies, the New York AG’s stern letters to the retailers are overlooking the good news.  Keep things as they are, add some fine print to the label, and many folks buying the “supplements” would be painlessly and cluelessly adding much needed grain (see above) and protein to their diets.

Speaking of food additives and DNA and now speaking of surveys which gauge the views of large numbers of us on scientific questions, here’s something wonderful which could have come from the amazing minds of the people at The Onion, but did not…repeat, did not:

Among many other questions posed in a survey conducted by the Oklahoma State University Department of Agricultural Economics, was one asking if the respondents would favor mandatory labeling of food containing DNA.  Take a moment to let that soak in.  Unsurprisingly but kind of depressingly, 80.44% said sure. They would love to know if something as clearly strange and dangerous as DNA was being added to their food.

Not from The Onion.

Posted in fyi, musings by maxwell | Leave a Comment »

update on CCML quarterly meeting Feb 13 2015

Posted by mariestpierre2525 on January 30, 2015

Directions and parking http://hslibrary.ucdenver.edu/directions
Please join us on February 13 at our next quarterly meeting. The meeting will be held in the University of Colorado Health Sciences Library Reading Room, on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

First, an education session at 8:15 a.m. Sandra Brown and Janet Hollingsworth from Anythink Studio will speak on the studio’s craft and tech creative programming.

Second: networking and refreshments from 9-9:30.

Next: a tour of the Ben Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, home of the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health. We will walk over from the Health Sciences Library to the BNC Building, a very short distance.

And then?: Our business meeting, starting at 10:45.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

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CCML quarterly Meeting Feb 13 2015

Posted by mariestpierre2525 on January 21, 2015

We will be meeting at the Health Sciences Library Reading Room, 3rd Floor, and for our main program we will walk over to the Ben Nighthorse Campbell Building for a tour.

Directions and parking http://hslibrary.ucdenver.edu/directions

8:15 to 9:00 education program Sandra Brown (Adult Guide) and Janet Hollingsworth (Teen Guide) to speak about the craft and tech creative programming happening at Anythink Studio.

9:00 to 9:30 networking and refreshments

9: 30 to 10:30 main program we will walk over to the Ben Nighthorse Campbell Building  http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/PublicHealth/research/centers/CAIANH/about/Pages/Building.aspx

10:30 to 10:45 break

10:45 to 11:45 business meeting

Posted in fyi | Leave a Comment »

 
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